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True or False | Test Your Dental IQ With This Short Quiz!

Have you ever encountered weird questions or claims concerning human teeth? Well, if it's yes, then that is not surprising at all. With the many pieces of information being put out on the web, it’s a bit of a challenge to distinguish dental facts from myths now.

Sure, you may have picked up sufficient knowledge about dental health from school and from your dentist; however, there are some important things about dentistry and orthodontics which you may not have discovered yet.

Fortunately, we have come up with this short true or false quiz to test your dental IQ, clarify certain claims, and give a coherent and sound explanation to each. Are you ready? Then let's get the ball rolling!

True and False Quiz

  1. Oral probiotics can help treat dental health disorders such as gum disease.
    • True
    • False
  2. Electric toothbrushes are better at cleaning your teeth than manual toothbrushes.
    • True
    • False
  3. You'll need to clean your teeth more than twice a day when you have braces.
    • True
    • False
  4. After your orthodontist removes your braces, you no longer need a dental appliance.
    • True
    • False
  5. Unlike soda, sports drinks are harmless to your teeth.
    • True
    • False
  6. All primary (baby) teeth should have emerged by the age of 3.
    • True
    • False
  7. Flossing is optional - brushing one’s teeth twice a day is all that matters.
    • True
    • False
  8. Mouthwash should never be used by children under the age of 6 unless a pediatric dentist recommends it for a specified purpose.
    • True
    • False

Answer Key

  1. Oral probiotics can help treat dental health disorders such as gum disease.
  2. True. Probiotics are a well-known example of natural medicine. These oral products contain live bacterial cultures that help promote good bacteria in the mouth by balancing out its acidic environment. Oral probiotics have been found to improve gum health, minimize plaque, and freshen breath. Moreover, this also alleviates the symptoms of certain oral disorders such as gingivitis, halitosis, periodontitis, and several others.

  3. Electric toothbrushes are better at cleaning your teeth than manual toothbrushes.
  4. True. Electric toothbrushes have a stroke rate of 3,000 to 40,000 per minute, while a focused, undisturbed manual brushing gives only around 300 strokes per minute. What you just need to do is position it on your teeth and be sure to move it over each tooth's surface. Even the slowest electric toothbrush, which generates roughly 3,000 strokes per minute, is ten times more than the average person can perform with a manual toothbrush on their own. Increased strokes per minute equates to a lot better clean in a much less amount of time. This is excellent news, particularly for children who are easily sidetracked or whose arm and hand become fatigued by the time they finish their brushing session. It also makes keeping your teeth clean simpler while wearing braces or other dental devices.

  5. You'll need to clean your teeth more than twice a day when you have braces.
  6. True. When you get braces, you'll have to brush your teeth after every meal and snack, rather than simply twice a day like you (hopefully) used to. Brush your teeth properly before going to bed. This needs to be done due to the many tiny spaces in which food and germs can hide and pose problems, especially if they remain on your teeth for an extended period of time. After getting braces, it's vital to learn proper brushing and flossing procedures from a dental professional. One recommendation would be to brush your teeth lightly from top to bottom, back and forth, then in a circular fashion, hitting all the places above and beneath the wires.

  7. After your orthodontist removes your braces, you no longer need a dental appliance.
  8. False. In order to maintain your teeth in their after-treatment position, your orthodontist is likely to recommend a retainer. The retention phase of treatment needs to be properly planned and executed so as to maintain your desirable post-braces outcomes. When this orthodontic appliance is worn correctly, it would keep patients from needing braces a second time and prevent the teeth from shifting back out of alignment.

  9. Unlike soda, sports drinks are harmless to your teeth.
  10. False. High fructose corn syrup and sucrose are two common ingredients in sports drinks. A single 12-ounce bottle may contain 21 grams of sugar, which can be harmful when it comes into contact with streptococcus mutans, one of the numerous varieties of bacteria that dwell in your mouth. This bacterium eats the sugar and produces acids, which chip away at your teeth. Furthermore, the high acid content in sports drinks wears down your enamel, making your teeth more sensitive and vulnerable to cavities and decay.

  11. All primary (baby) teeth should have emerged by the age of 3.
  12. True. By around 6 months of age, the first milk tooth breaks through your baby’s gums. The two lower central incisors are usually the first two teeth to emerge, while the upper four front teeth appear next. Following that, more primary teeth gradually begin to erupt, usually in pairs — one on each side of the upper or lower jaw. Normally, all primary teeth should have erupted in a child’s mouth around the age of 3. However, if this is not the case for your child, it is a good idea then to get his or her mouth examined by a dental professional. Through regular dental check-ups, your dentist will be able to explain why your child has missing teeth, and will use dental x-rays and other examinations to track their progress.

  13. Flossing is optional - brushing one’s teeth twice a day is all that matters.
  14. False. Flossing is just as important as brushing. Flossing removes food and bacteria from between teeth that toothbrushes can't reach, and it helps minimize plaque. Tooth decay and gingivitis are less likely when there is less food, germs, and plaque on your teeth. In combination with brushing twice a day, flossing once a day lowers your risk of acquiring gingivitis and other dental disease.

  15. Mouthwash should never be used by children under the age of 6 unless a pediatric dentist recommends it for a specified purpose.
  16. True. Swishing and spitting out is difficult for most children under the age of six. Swallowing mouthwash could induce stomach pain, sickness, vomiting, and other major health problems, depending on the ingredients. Most mouthwashes contain fluoride or alcohol and that is not good news for your child. A child's health may be jeopardized if they ingest mouthwash containing alcohol.

    Did you get all the right answers? If yes, then congratulations! You are now a certified dental aficionado and if you implement your knowledge your family can enjoy healthy teeth and gums for years to come!

At Jungle Roots Children’s Dentistry & Orthodontics, we strive to provide the highest comprehensive pediatric and orthodontic dental care in a unique, fun-filled environment staffed by a team of caring, energetic professionals. We believe the establishment of a “dental home” at an early age is the key to a lifetime of positive visits to the dentist.

Call Us - (480) 759-1119

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